It’s not enough to just share content through social channels – you need to actively participate in the community, too. Got a Twitter account? Then join in group discussions with relevant hashtags. Is your audience leaving comments on your Facebook posts? Answer questions and engage with your readers. Nothing turns people off quicker than using social media as a broadcast channel – use social media as it was intended and actually interact with your fans.

What I’m getting at is using Google’s related searches to your advantage. Google related search queries are exactly what they sound like—searches that Google has algorithmically associated with certain groups of keywords. So, if you find a keyword that has high volume, is relevant to your target audience and business goals, and has relatively low competition, your job isn’t done. Instead, make sure that you’re taking note of related searches to ensure your content is in-depth and fully addresses the topic.
As a new blogger or entrepreneur, one of the challenges you encounter is for your blog post or your website to “rank” well in the search results of any search engine. By ranking, I mean that whenever your potential reader or prospect searches for a product or service that you have to offer, your website comes up on the first page of the search results. The term “Organic Search” means that someone is searching for your website or post through the traditional search on the search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.). This is also known as organic ranking.

The response rate here was huge because this is a mutually beneficial relationship. The bloggers get free products to use within their outfits (as well as more clothes for their wardrobe!) and I was able to drive traffic through to my site, get high-quality backlinks, a load of social media engagement and some high-end photography to use within my own content and on product pages.


This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?
TrafficWave is, again, not quite a traffic exchange. Rather, it’s a valuable tool to use with the traffic you’ve already attained. It’s a fairly sophisticated autoresponder for email lists, with a 30-day trial and a suite of tools designed to help you put together the best autoresponses available. Use it in conjunction with any of your affiliate or referral programs for a sizable benefit.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
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