This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?

However, you can't describe web traffic gained as targeted traffic. There are many methods for driving traffic using SEO, videos articles etc. However one would not describe this as the best tool to achieve a commercial objective with a business. There are many tools eg. http://real-traffic-webfire-review.blogspot.co.uk/ that allow for free traffic generation but more importantly by using the right keywords produce targeted traffic. Targeted web traffic is the key to sales conversion.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
In short, press request alerts are requests for sources of information from journalists. Let's say you're a journalist putting together an article on wearable technology for The Guardian. Perhaps you need a quote from an industry expert or some products that you can feature within your article? Well, all you need to do is send out a request to a press service and you can wait for someone to get back to you.
So many businesses are focused on attracting new customers through content marketing that they forget about more traditional methods. Email marketing can be a powerful tool, and even a moderately successful email blast can result in a significant uptick in traffic. Just be careful not to bombard people with relentless emails about every single update in your business. Also, don’t overlook the power of word-of-mouth marketing, especially from people who are already enjoying your products or services. A friendly email reminder about a new service or product can help you boost your traffic, too.
This isn’t necessarily anything really technical, but rather subjective. In my humble content marketing opinion, perfection is overrated. Now, does that mean you get to skip out on the research and publish crap? No, no. Instead, it means that there is a point of diminishing returns and sometimes, it’s better to ship it, assess performance, and revise.
Encourage incoming links. Google prioritises sites that have a lot of incoming links, especially from other trustworthy sites. Encourage clients, friends, family members, partners, suppliers, industry mavens and friendly fellow bloggers to link to your site. The more incoming links you have the higher your site will rank. But beware SEO snake oil salesmen who try to trick Google with spammy links from low-reputation sites. Some links can actually damage your SEO.
Crawlable is nothing new to anyone in SEO; this simply means that the structure of our pages allowed for all of the most important content to quickly and easily be crawled and indexed by search engine robots. It actually sounds easier than it is… ensuring that the content is rendered (code wise) in the most ideal format for robots to parse takes more consideration than just laying out your div’s to properly render your designs.
What I’m getting at is using Google’s related searches to your advantage. Google related search queries are exactly what they sound like—searches that Google has algorithmically associated with certain groups of keywords. So, if you find a keyword that has high volume, is relevant to your target audience and business goals, and has relatively low competition, your job isn’t done. Instead, make sure that you’re taking note of related searches to ensure your content is in-depth and fully addresses the topic.
Every website has to be structured in a way to make it easy for your audience to find what they’re looking for. There are several elements residing on your site that help in optimizing for SEO. The content that you write that you’re most proud of serves as your “cornerstone” content. Think of a mall and the one or two department stores that are called Anchor Stores. They are the reason people come to the mall. Your cornerstone content should play that role. They should be the main reason for people to come to this website.
TrafficWave is, again, not quite a traffic exchange. Rather, it’s a valuable tool to use with the traffic you’ve already attained. It’s a fairly sophisticated autoresponder for email lists, with a 30-day trial and a suite of tools designed to help you put together the best autoresponses available. Use it in conjunction with any of your affiliate or referral programs for a sizable benefit.
Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.

For example, in Facebook, you can target specific groups or user pages that are cohesive with your keywords. You can then promote your website products or blog posts to that audience. In Twitter, you can search by hashtag for some of the keywords you write about. You can then reply or do a mention to that audience and see how your products or blog post can help them solve their problem.

PBP is sort of a cross between a traffic generator and a multi-level marketing scheme, only without the threats that MLM traditionally entails. You’re not absolutely required to sign up under someone, though the program does cost money on a monthly basis. You’re granted access to traffic generation tools, as well as other promotional information and training. The MLM comes in with their referral commissions, which many people use more than the marketing tools themselves. There’s a sizable commission for enrolling new members, as well as seeing them succeed.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
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